add-boxaddarrow-leftarrow-rightcameracheck-markclosecodedeleteediterroreyefood-menumenuprintsearchstar-ratestars-rating
https://s3.amazonaws.com/ka-images-prod/mastheads/cooking-tools.jpg

Pressure Canned Stock

Roast the bones in a 400F oven for an hour, or so. We want a dark browning, but no burning. Take this as far as you dare. The darker your roast, the richer your flavor and color. Transfer the bones into your stock pot, using tongs. Drain off any fat, for later use. If you are making chicken stock, I recommend using the fat to make french fries, because we can. Pour enough wine into your roasting p. . .

Recipe Tags

?

Example: #Lunch #Sandwhich #BBQ

Cuisine Tags

?

Example: #Spanish #Mexican

Created on

Favorited: 0

Your Rating

Servings: 20

Prep Time: 00:30

Cook Time: 24:00

Main Ingredients

bones (beef, chicken, pork, lamb, emu, etc. )

vegetables (carrots, onions, celery, garlic, turnips, parsnips, etc. )

herbs (parsley, thyme, sage, rosemary, bay leaf etc. play around)

wine (white for chicken/pork, red for emu/beef/elk)

spices (black pepper. keep it simple. get fancy with the later dishes)

seasoning (salt after reduction, if at all)

Preparation

1Roast the bones in a 400F oven for an hour, or so. We want a dark browning, but no burning. Take this as far as you dare. The darker your roast, the richer your flavor and color.

2Transfer the bones into your stock pot, using tongs. Drain off any fat, for later use. If you are making chicken stock, I recommend using the fat to make french fries, because we can.

3Pour enough wine into your roasting pan to cover the bottom. Using a spatula, scrape the crusty bits, as they soften. Pour all of this in the stock pot. I use a large electric roasting pan, as it frees up the stove, and holds a steady temperature, but a large non-aluminum pot will do.

4Add the vegetables. Ends of carrots should be trimmed, onions peeled, everything washed. To be honest, I don’t peel garlic, for stock. I break the cloves free from the head, but just strain any peel out, later. Things can be coarsely chopped, or whole. The long cook will extract all of the goodness, regardless. There is some debate over peeling of carrots, as the skin is slightly more bitter than the rest of the root, but I’m willing to take that in exchange for the vitamins. Add your herbs. Fresh or dry is fine. Traditionally, thyme, parsley, and bay leaf are used, but sage is good in poultry stock, and rosemary is nice with beef and game.

5Cover everything with water by a couple inches. Bring this to a simmer, and leave it gently bubbling, over night.

6In the morning, strain the stock through a sieve, into a fresh pot. Make note of how high in the pot it is. Reduce the stock by 2/3 to 3/4, by simmering gently, uncovered, for hours.

7Once you reach your desired concentration, skim all of the fat off the stock, with a small ladle. Season if you wish, then prepare to can.

8If you have a large measuring cup (I use a plastic gallon pitcher) it can be helpful in determining how many jars you will need. If not, eyeball the amount of stock, and prep a few extra jars. Wash all jars, and place them on a baking sheet, mouths up. Put them in a 225F oven, for 15 minutes to sterilize.

9Boil some water, and pour it over your lids, to soften the seals.

10Place 2 quarts of water, and a splash of white vinegar (prevents hard water deposits on jars) in your pressure caner. Optionally, you can line the bottom of the canner with a tea towel, to reduce the risk of jar movement and breakage, during processing.

11When the jars are sterile, fill them with the hot concentrated stock, leaving 1/2” head space. Wipe the rims to ensure a good seal, place lids on the jars, and secure, finger tight with rings.

12Using canning tongs, arrange the jars in the canner. Secure the lid, with the steam shuttle off, and turn the heat on high. When steam can be seen escaping the steam valve, add the shuttle, and wait for the pressure to rise. When it hits 15 lbs, lower the heat to a simmer, just enough to maintain the pressure. Set your timer for 45 minutes for pints, 60 minutes for quarts. When the time is up, kill the heat, and leave it alone until the pressure normalizes. DO NOT remove the weighted shuttle to vent the steam!!!

13Once the pressure has dropped to zero, open the canner and remove the jars to a dish towel covered counter top. Marvel at the ongoing boil within the jars, and wait to hear that victorious ping, as the lids seal. Let the jars sit, undisturbed, until completely cool.

14Check that all lids have sealed by attempting to depress the center of each lid. Any that ping are not sealed. Refrigerate these for immediate use. Label date and store the rest!

Reviews: 0

Select A Menu

Create A New Menu

Please enter a menu name

This menu name already exists. Please choose a different name

×

Success

This recipe was added to . You can view here or close this window

×

Recipe Embed

Do you have questions or need help embedding recipes? Contact us at info@kulinarian.com


In your blog post, create a "Link" with the text;

Set the link's URL or "href" to the below URL.

The link must include "?embed=link" and any additional parameters

In the footer of your blog (or below your blog post content) add the recipe embed code. This code can be embedded globally on your entire website, for use with all Kulinarian embeds.

You may need to refresh your page or blog post to see the recipe populate.

Detailed Instructions For Site-builders & CMS's

Squarespace

Weebly

Wordpress

×