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Ancho Chili Pickled Eggs

Add some zip to boiled eggs.

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Servings: 12

Prep Time: 00:20

Cook Time: 00:15

Main Ingredients

24 chicken or duck eggs (unwashed, free-range, local are best.   try craigslist, if you don't have a laying flock. )

3 cups distilled white vinegar

1 cup non chlorinated water (if you are on city water, be aware that chlorine, which evaporates out of standing water in 24 hours, has been replaced by chloramine, in most municipalities.   this will not off gas, and can only be removed through filtration or distillation.   city water is not suitable for cooking, as chloramine kills gut flora.   this is only my opinion, so act accordingly. )

1 tsp kosher salt

1/4 cup raw sugar

1 tbl black peppercorns

1 tbl coriander seeds

12 whole cloves

2 ancho chilis, stemmed, seeded, and crushed or sliced

2 bay leaves

3 cloves of garlic, sliced

1 yellow onion, thinly sliced

6 sprigs of thyme

Preparation

1Place room temperature, washed eggs in a pot of water, full enough to cover them.  Add a splash of vinegar and a healthy pinch of salt to the water.  The acidity of the vinegar with break down the shell membrane, making for easier peeling.  Starting in cool water will minimize ruptured eggs.  Bring to a boil, and set a timer for however long it takes to hard boil eggs, at your elevation.  Twelve minutes works at sea level.  I go 15, up here. 

2Remove the eggs to an ice bath to cool and shock them, further aiding in the peeling ease.  Fresh eggs are harder to peel than two week old eggs, so use your oldest, of course.  As an aside, if you have never had farm fresh eggs, you have likely never had and egg fresher than a month old. 

3As the eggs cool, bring the vinegar, water, salt, sugar and flavoring ingredients to a simmer, for ten minutes.  Turn off the heat, and let this steep while you carefully peel your eggs. 

4In the bottom of two sterilized quart mason jars, arrange some of the goodies from the brine.  A slotted spoon, or tongs are helpful, here. 

5Put a dozen peeled eggs in each jar, then ladle the brine in to fill each jar above the egg level. 

6Screw on lids and refrigerate for one week before eating.  These should last for six to twelve months, but I find it hard to keep them around that long!

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